FREE Printable Homeschool Worksheets for Morning Work

FREE Printable Homeschool Worksheets for Morning Work

Do morning work the easy way! Printable homeschool worksheets make it easy for you to help your kids develop and practice basic skills. Morning work printables specifically help your kids to learn how to use a calendar while giving them number writing practice.

I like to start my kids’ school days with calendaring worksheets. You can download – for FREE! – the August calendaring work that my kids will use this upcoming school year.

(See all of our curriculum choices for the 2020-2021 school year here.)

The calendaring work I give my kids is dependent on their age and capabilities.

  • A preschooler or kindergartener that is not yet comfortable writing numbers can use stickers or stamps to fill in today’s date on the larger calendar that is printed in landscape mode (sideways), or they can color in the number of the date. They can also color in the name of the month. At that age, children are working on their fine motor skills and building up hand strength for handwriting, and coloring, stickers, and stamps will help them with that.
  • Kids that are comfortable writing their numbers and letters (kindergarten/first grade) can use the smaller calendar printed in portrait mode (straight up and down) to trace the month name and trace the number (or write the number) on the calendar. 

For older kids, I add in date writing. I started doing this because I realized that, while kids in a traditional school setting learn how to write out a date on their schoolwork and notes, that’s something that’s often missed in homeschools. It’s also a great way to sneak in month and weekday spelling practice!

  • For a first or second grader, I give them the most basic date writing worksheet to write the date in the form Month Day, Year. For example, “August 24, 2020”.
  • For a second or third grader, I give them the date writing worksheet with smaller lines and add the weekday into the date. For example, “Monday, August 24, 2020”.
  • For older kids, I add digital date writing practice. For example 8/24/2020.

I’ve made it easy for you to start your homeschool year with calendaring work by providing our August calendar worksheets to you for free! Click to download the worksheets, type in the numbers if you want your student to trace numbers, print the worksheets that you want to use, and then put them in a morning work binder or folder for your students.

(FYI, you can find the supplies I use for my printables here.)

printable homeschool worksheets

And please let me know how these worksheets work for you and your family!

printable homeschool worksheets

printable homeschool worksheets

printable homeschool worksheets

printable homeschool worksheets

Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade

Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade

 

When I first considered homeschooling my kids, one of the big things holding me back was the idea of teaching all subjects to all of my children while also being constantly available to each of them. As an introverted, highly sensitive mama, I knew that I would get overwhelmed very quickly. My husband, knowing me as he does, was concerned for me, too.

I had a nursing baby at the time, so I decided to start researching homeschooling by watching YouTube videos so that I could see how other moms got it all done. One video, created by Erica at Confessions of a Homeschooler, introduced me to the homeschool workbox system. Suddenly, homeschooling seemed possible! Even my husband agreed to be all in on homeschooling if I homeschooled “like that.” 

So from Day One, I’ve implemented a version of the workbox system in our homeschool. It has evolved over time to meet our specific needs, but we continue to love it.

Organizing with Homeschool Workboxes

Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade

Like Erica, I use a drawer system as our homeschool workboxes. While my younger children use the Seville Classics Large 10-Drawer Organizer Cart as workboxes (check out my first grader’s homeschool workboxes), my fourth grader uses the IKEA drawer unit at his desk. It has five drawers, and each drawer is assigned to two different subjects and labeled appropriately.

Homeschool Workboxes - Subject Labels

I printed the labels onto Avery Sticker Project Paper, cut them apart, and placed them on the appropriate drawers. I love this sticker paper because it’s repositionable, so you can get them just right.

Lesson Plan

A key aspect of my fourth grader’s homeschool workbox system is his list of work. Each week, I print out the work I have planned for him from Homeschool Planet (an online lesson planner) and put it on his clipboard. Each evening, I make sure he has what he needs for each subject in his drawers, and I highlight the items that he can do independently.

Some items, like his morning work, Bible, and reading, are almost always independent work. If I need to teach a new math, spelling, grammar, or writing lesson (typically on Mondays), he’ll have to wait for me to work with him. But then he can usually do most of the work in those subject on his own for the rest of the week.

There are times that I have to change up the plan. In that case, I’ll either write in the change on the print-out, or print it out again and replace what’s on his clipboard. It’s not unusual for me to have to reprint the plan at some point during the week.

What’s in the drawers?

Please watch the video above to really get into the nitty-gritty of the contents of my fourth grader’s drawers, and our Curriculum Choices video for more information about our curriculum choices. But here’s a quick description of each drawer:

Bible / Handwriting

This top drawer contains my son’s glasses, Bible, Word of Life Devotional, Handwriting Without Tears Cursive workbook, and a drawer organizer. I love the drawer organizer because it sits on top of the edges of the drawer, allowing me to put his cursive workbook underneath. The drawer organizer holds items like pencils, highlighters, a pen, and scissors. Pencils tend to get left all around the house, so I wrap each child’s pencils with washi tape that’s their color (yes, I color-code my kids) so that I know who left what out. I’m hoping (really, really hoping) that this accountability will help them to learn to clean up after themselves.

Morning Work / History

This drawer contains my fourth grader’s Morning Work and history binders, his Scripture copywork notebook, and usually a book related to the historical topic that we are currently learning about.

His Morning Work binder contains calendaring sheets, assigned copywork, and mental warm-ups. And isn’t this binder cover the cutest?!

We do a lot of our history together as a group, along with age-appropriate notebooking. The history binder contains my son’s completed notebooking pages. I plan out history a couple of weeks at a time, so I’ll print out whatever notebooking pages he’ll need over the next couple of weeks and put them in a file folder in this drawer. When I prep his drawers each night for the next day, I’ll pull whatever pages he will need from the folder and put them on top of the folder.

Math / Science

This drawer contains my fourth grader’s math binder, graph paper notebook, science lab notebook, and science folder.

We’re using Math-U-See, which does come in a workbook, but I re-order the worksheets into a binder to fit our needs. Sometimes I’ll assign another resource (like the Multiplication Dot-to-Dot workbook you’ll see in the video), so I’ll add those supplemental resources to the drawer on the days he’ll need them.

I’ve been treating science very much the way I’ve been treating history, with group work supplemented by notebooking pages. This drawer holds notebooking pages when we have them. Once they’re completed, he adds them to his science folder

Spelling / Grammar

This drawer contains a Boogie Board that we use for All About Spelling. I’ve also put together a Spelling Practice binder with worksheets for practicing his All About Spelling words. The other materials we use for All About Spelling are a teacher’s manual, which I keep with my other teacher’s manuals, and the All About Spelling app, which we use on my iPad.

We also keep my fourth grader’s Fix It Grammar student book and notebook in this drawer, along with a plastic envelope for the Fix It Grammar cards that we’re currently using.

Writing / Reading

This last drawer holds my fourth grader’s IEW Student Writing Intensive materials, along with some additional reading if he doesn’t have a book in his history drawer. I prefer to have him read out of a book that he can hold in his hands, but sometimes I need to resort to an e-book, so I keep my old Kindle in here for his use. (I love this thing! It was a Valentine’s gift from my husband during our first year of marriage. He knows I prefer electronics to jewelry. 😉 ) I’ll eventually switch him over to the newer Kindle, which is waterproof!

I hope this peek into my fourth grader’s homeschool workbox system was helpful! The labels that I use for his drawers are available for download, so go ahead and grab a copy today!

You may also be interested in:

Homeschool Workboxes for First Grade

Homeschool Workboxes for Pre-K

Videos you may find helpful:

Homeschool Curriculum Choices 2018-2019
How We Use All About Spelling

Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade
Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade
Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade

** This post contains affiliate links.

Homeschool Workboxes for First Grade

Homeschool Workboxes for First Grade

 

When I first considered homeschooling my kids, one of the big things holding me back was the idea of teaching all subjects to all of my children while also being constantly available to each of them. As an introverted, highly sensitive mama, I knew that I would get overwhelmed very quickly. My husband, knowing me as he does, was concerned for me, too.

I had a nursing baby at the time, so I decided to start researching homeschooling by watching YouTube videos so that I could see how other moms got it all done. One video, created by Erica at Confessions of a Homeschooler, introduced me to the homeschool workbox system. Suddenly, homeschooling seemed possible! Even my husband agreed to be all in on homeschooling if I homeschooled “like that.” 

So from Day One, I’ve implemented a version of the workbox system in our homeschool. It has evolved over time to meet our specific needs, but we continue to love it.

Organizing with Homeschool Workboxes

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links. See my disclosure  for more information.)

Homeschool Workboxes for First Grade

Like Erica, I use a drawer system as our homeschool workboxes. I chose the Seville Classics Large 10-Drawer Organizer Cart for its  wider drawers that comfortably hold a binder. My first grader’s drawers are each assigned to a different subject and labeled appropriately. I’ve ordered the drawers in the order that I usually want him to do his work (from the top down), but the drawers do come out and can be re-ordered easily.  

Besides a label, each drawer also has an indicator that you can move to show red, green, or in between. Since my first grader doesn’t have work in every drawer every day, I move the indicator to green if a drawer has work for him to do that day. When he’s done with the work in that drawer, he moves the indicator back to red. He loves being able to glance at his drawers and see how much work he has that day (it’s often the first thing he does in the morning!), and I can glance at the drawers to see how much he’s done.

Crate Contents

A file crate lives on top of the drawer system. I color-code my kids so that I can identify the owners of certain belongings with a glance, so his name on the front of the crate, his folders, and his clipboard are all in his color. 

Crate for Homeschool Workboxes

The clipboard is one of the most important things in his crate. It holds a checklist of his work for the week, which I print out from Homeschool Planet (an online lesson planner). Each day when I fill his drawers, I can just pull out the clipboard and see what I have planned for him for the next day. I should mention that the lesson plan is not set in stone. It’s just a plan, not my boss, so I change it as needed. But schooling three kids and having a lot going on, I absolutely must have some plan in place to refer to so that I’m not standing in front of the drawers each evening trying to come up with a plan on the fly.

While a lot of my first grader’s work is in binders that generally stay in his drawers, I keep a few resources, like some worksheets, book reports, and file folder games, in folders in the crate until they’re needed. Keeping these materials close at hand makes filling the drawers quick and easy.

The crate also contains reading material. I keep his Hooked on Phonics books and readers for the year in the crate, along with any other books that I have planned for him to read over the next month or so. That way I don’t have to go looking for them when it’s time to fill his drawers.

What’s in the drawers?

Now let’s take a closer look at the contents of each drawer on this particular day:

Morning Work

Homeschool Workboxes - Morning Work

This drawer contains my first grader’s glasses and Morning Work binder, which he works out of every day. His Morning Work binder contains calendaring sheets as well as some copywork. And isn’t this binder cover the cutest?! The printable comes with many different binder covers. I chose this little guy because he has a big smile like my first grader.

Math

Homeschool Workboxes - Math

This drawer contains my first grader’s math binder. We’re using Math-U-See, which does come in a workbook, but I re-order the worksheets into a binder to fit our needs. Last year I had all of the math worksheets in a folder in his crate and just pulled out pages each day to put in his drawer, but there were days that he wanted to work ahead and do more. Keeping it all in a binder allows him to work ahead if he wants to without him having to wait for me to pull out more worksheets.

Handwriting

Homeschool Workboxes - Handwriting

This is where his Handwriting Without Tears workbook lives. And that’s all I have to say about that. 🙂

Spelling

Homeschool Workboxes - Spelling

My first grader is doing a couple of different things for spelling this year (please refer to our Curriculum Choices video for more information). This drawer usually contains a Spelling You See worksheet along with a Boogie Board that we use for All About Spelling. I’ve also put together a Spelling Practice binder with worksheets for practicing his All About Spelling words. That binder stays in the crate on top of the drawers on days that we’re not using it. The other materials we use for All About Spelling are a teacher’s manual, which I keep with my other teacher’s manuals, and the All About Spelling app, which we use on my iPad.

Grammar

Homeschool Workboxes - Grammar
Homeschool Workboxes - Grammar

This drawer contains our First Language Lessons book and the Kumon Writing workbook for Grade 1. My curriculum video explains more about why we have two different resources in here, but basically it looked like First Language Lessons wasn’t going to work out, so I selected a Kumon resource to give him another way to learn parts of speech.

Bible

Homeschool Workboxes - Bible

He reads out of The Beginner’s Bible every day. It’s a bit above his reading level, so I treat it as shared reading. When it’s time to read out of his Bible and do his other reading (below), we move to the couch to be more comfortable.

Reading

Homeschool Workboxes - Reading

This drawer holds his Hooked on Phonics material, plus another fun reader if he doesn’t have a reader in his history drawer (below). Reading real books every day has helped both of my older boys progress more quickly and naturally in their reading abilities (especially in recognizing sight words!), so I always have him reading out of a book as well as working through his phonics program.

History

Homeschool Workboxes - History
Homeschool Workboxes - History

We do a lot of our history together as a group, along with age-appropriate notebooking. This drawer is the home for my first grader’s history binder, which holds his notebooking pages. It also often contains a reader related to the historical topic that we are currently learning about.

Science

I’ve been treating science very much the way I’ve been treating history, with group work supplemented by notebooking pages. This drawer holds notebooking pages when we have them.

Writing

I’m saving this drawer for a couple of writing projects that we’ll do later in the year.

I hope this peek into my first grader’s homeschool workbox system was helpful! The labels that I use for his drawers are available for download, so go ahead and grab a copy today!

You may also be interested in:

Homeschool Workboxes for Fourth Grade

Homeschool Workboxes for Pre-K

Videos you may find helpful:

Homeschool Curriculum Choices 2018-2019
How We Use All About Spelling

** This post contains affiliate links.

All in a Day’s Work

All in a Day’s Work

This morning I took a trip to Ye Old Medical Lab for some routine blood work. The blood work itself was routine, but it messed up my own routine by requiring that I fast this morning. FAST. As in No Breakfast For You. On a morning that I was especially Hungry. I thought about sneaking a bowl of Fiber One cereal since the large amounts of fiber (hence the name) don’t allow the food to stay in my digestive system for very long, causing minimum impact. So that’s kind of like fasting, right? But when I thought about it a little more I realized that my hips don’t lie and maybe my little fiber theory isn’t entirely valid. WebMD does not a doctor make.

(At this point I’m sure that my Physician Assistant baby sister is reaching for her cell phone to scoff at my lack of medical knowledge. And maybe I should be going to her for medical advice. She’s got the degree and all. But every time I look at her I see the little girl with pigtails, pointy BX glasses, and a look in her eye that said, “I’m trouble – with a capital T and that rhymes with P and that stands for Pool!” Although she’s not much of a pool player. But I’m a Music Man fan and couldn’t resist. Any Music Man fans out there? Anybody? No? Oh, nevermind.)

Anyhoo…

I digress.

So I left the house, escaping the Fiber One lure, and eased on down the road (what’s with the musical references today?) to the medical lab, or, as I like to call it, the House of Pain. You see, my veins take on a cloak of invisibility when they sense the presence of a needle. Those inexperienced with The Needle use me as a pin cushion until I’m on the verge of passing out. So whenever I’m confronted by a new lab technician, I wonder, “Do you know what you’re doing?”

So I walk into the lobby area, sign in, and chat with the technician for a few minutes. She asks me if I’m fasting, and I say yes along with an “I’m ready for a cup of coffee!” She agrees with me but tells me that she can’t have coffee because she’s going through a detox.

Say wha?

No, no, no, this can’t be good.

We’ve established that I do not have a mind filled with medical knowledge, but I’ll go ahead and say that I do not think that people undergoing detox are, shall we say, well-fed. And I’m of the mind that a well-fed person is a happy person. And only happy people should be wielding needles. Especially if those needles are directed toward my person.

We continued with the chit-chat and I relaxed. I tried not to think about the needle, like I was sitting in the funny chair with my sleeve rolled up just because I considered it to be comfortable and a good time to make a fashion statement. I was very pleasantly surprised that the detoxed-yet-wonderful lab technician got what she needed with one stab.

I feel that it’s important to compliment good work, so I told her that I appreciated her expertise and the minimum of pain. She shared her secret with me – you may not be able to see a vein, but you can feel it. She simply knew what she was doing. And I realized that if you want something done right, you’ve gotta go to the experts.

Words to live by, my friend. Words to live by.

So I went on my merry way and rewarded myself with a trip to Starbucks for a biscotti and tall skinny vanilla latte. Actually, I tried to convince myself that I deserved a full sugar latte, for the pain and suffering and all, but Myself didn’t buy it. So I got the skinny latte…and totally forgot about the biscotti. Coffee on an empty stomach. Nice. Pouring salt on the wound, so to speak.

That’s how my work day began – little food, a lot of blood, and a very boring story to share.

Thank you for reliving the experience with me.

Good night.

1st Grade Homeschool Curriculum Choices 2020-2021

1st Grade Homeschool Curriculum Choices 2020-2021

Before wrapping up our 2019-2020 school year (our fifth year homeschooling!), I dove into curriculum planning for next school year. It’s one of my favorite things. So today I’ll share with you our 1st grade homeschool curriculum choices.

You can find our 6th grade curriculum choices for 2019-2020 here.

You can find our 3rd grade curriculum choices for 2019-2020 here.

Factors That Affected Our Curriculum Choices

All of my kids are different from each other and every year I learning something new about each of them, so the first thing I do is update what I know about their Learning Preferences. My rising 1st grader is an independent learner but is still little enough that he likes to do things with Mommy, so I knew that I needed to focus on finding ways to allow him to work on his own while also finding curriculum and activities that I feel comfortable teaching and that possibly make it a little fun for us.

I also updated what I know about his Difficulties, Dislikes, and Delights. My youngest delights in being uniquely creative (drawing, not coloring) and struggles with following instructions, so I took those things into account.

I then considered the Three D’s from a family level. We’re in a season where I’ve time-blocked mornings for focusing on personal projects, so I decided that I would put a high priority on independent work for all of my kids this upcoming school year.

And, lastly, my philosophy is that it’s better to get effective learning done quickly than to have it take a lot of time while trying to make it “fun.” Work smart, not unnecessarily hard.

1st Grade Homeschool Curriculum Choices

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you, if you make a purchase using the links. See my disclosure for more information.)

Morning Work

For early elementary, I like to focus on calendaring activities. For this coming up year, I’ll create new calendar worksheets for my kids to use. You can get our August calendar for free!

I’ve been dabbling in mindfulness for the last several months, reflecting on the best part of each day and taking stock of my emotions. I’ve found it to be a helpful practice, so I’m incorporating mindfulness into my kids’ days with their Morning Work with worksheets that I’ll create to track their emotions and note the highlight of each day.

I like the idea of my kids starting off the day with fun(ish) brain exercises to get their mental juices flowing, so Scholastic Daily Word Ladders will be part of my youngest boy’s Morning Work binder.

Bible

We will continue with the early elementary New Testament portion of The Picture Smart Bible. Even though we only do a little each day, my son hasn’t loved coloring these pages. So after completing the New Testament pages, we’ll switch to the Old Testament pages and use them in conjunction with Old Testament Grapevine Studies for early elementary. The Grapevine studies are more about drawing than coloring, so I’m hoping that he enjoys them more.

homeschool year review 2020

Math

For math, my littlest boy will continue with Math-U-See and move to the Alpha level this coming up year. In addition to that, he’ll go through Kumon’s My Book of Telling Time and My First Book of Money: Counting Coins.

 

Reading / Phonics

My youngest boy is over halfway through the 1st grade level of Hooked on Phonics (see my review of Hooked on Phonics here), so we’ll continue with that and then move on to the 2nd grade level. In addition, we will also continue to use a reading list of “real” books for shared reading.

Handwriting

Handwriting Without Tears has been working well for us (you can see one of my reviews of Handwriting Without Tears here), so this coming up year we’ll continue with the first grade level.

Grammar

Since I’m focusing on independent learning for my students this coming up year, we’ll cover grammar using Evan-Moor’s Grammar & Punctuation for Grade 1. It will still require some one-on-one teaching about once a week, but I’m hoping that my first grader will be able to do the practice pages largely independently.

Spelling

For first grade spelling, we’ll try Evan-Moor’s Building Spelling Skills. But I do plan to supplement with extra sentence writing, and maybe even more spelling worksheets for difficult words.

Writing

Workbooks work well for my little one, allowing him to work independently after some initial teaching, so for writing this year we’re going to try Evan-Moor’s Daily 6-Trait Writing.

History

We’re going to tackle history (somewhat) together with Story of the World Volume 2 – Middle Ages. We went through volume 1 (Ancient Times) a few years ago. It actually took us two years to get through that time period, but this time around I want to make it easy-breezy by simply listening to the audiobook during lunch and maybe doing one little project a week. I may also incorporate Project Passport: The Middle Ages and Homeschool in the Woods Lap-Pak: The Knights. We plan to study the Middle Ages as a group, but we’ll see how that goes.

For our United States studies, my youngest will do Knowledge Box Central’s U.S. Government Lapbook. It’ll be his first lapbook, so I hope it’s fun for him!

U.S. Governent Lapbooks

Science

I’m excited to try Berean Builders’ Science in the Beginning with my two younger boys. My first grader will be doing some narration in little notebooks, which I hope will speak to his creative soul. In order to make things easier for me, I also purchased the lab kit from Rainbow Resources.

Geography

My first grader will start learning map skills this year with Evan-Moor’s Beginning Geography. It looks like a fun little workbook, so I think he’ll enjoy it.

 

Art

Since my little one loves creativity, I’ve been trying to pull in different artistic resources for him to try. We’ve been enjoying the drawing tutorials on the YouTube channel Art for Kids Hub. We also have several Draw Write Now books. But really the best thing I can do is to keep a well-stocked craft room for him to use!

Piano

My husband (former middle school choir director) plans to get all of the boys started on piano lessons (and maybe voice lessons?) with him this coming up year. I’m not gonna lie – that sounds stressful to me. Better him than me. 😜

He chose this series of books for their piano lessons. Hoping for the best. 🤞

It’s going to be a full year, but I’m excited about our 1st grade homeschool curriculum choices!

1st grade homeschool curriculum

1st grade homeschool curriculum

1st grade homeschool curriculum